Tim Pahuta

54 thoughts on “Tim Pahuta”

  1. TP – I think everyone hits a crossroad in life. A decision point. Some are forced on us and others are obvious. You have been able to live part of a “dream” most boys dream of growing up. Not the riding in buses for hours and living on a per diem, but playing the greatest game ever.

    Fortunately, you are still young enough that finding a career is possible. Certainly along the way you have made contacts that may be very useful now. A communications degree is still relevant and can take you anywhere u want to go. I understand change is anxiety provoking, but your experiences the past 10 years playing ball have prepared you for this moment. It may not look the way you expected, but the journey is interesting. Follow your passion and if you can get paid doing that even better. It may not involve playing ball now, but I am sure having been down 0 and 2 in the count many times you have found ways to foul off pitches until you can find one to drive. Life is the same. I started medical school at age 30 with a family and wouldn’t change a thing. Was there anxiety and fear? Absolutely. But, it brought me to this point in my life.

    I know you will do great at whatever passion u follow. And if u ever pass through Columbia, Mo again we can talk about this ove a beer or two. Best of luck to you!!

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  2. Write a book? You’re a pretty good writer and might be onto something here. And I beg to differ—I think that you’ve had a very successful baseball career. I am one of your biggest fans though…😉

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      1. I would read it an i have no idea who you are. Unemployment is a hot issue right now it could be pretty good.

        If that does not work out i volunteer to teach you to program if you had the discipline to follow baseball for that many years you probably have an incredible work ethic.

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      2. It all depends, of course. There’ve been lots of books written about being in the minors, and of course, your name recognition won’t sell more than a few hundred copies, so you’ll have to write something that’s not been done before. That’s not to say it can’t be done, but it’s probably not very easy. Then again, neither is being a pro ballplayer, so..

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  3. Tim, I watched you here in Hagerstown. You were one of the fan favorites and rightly so. You were friendly with the fans and were very kind to the kids. You have a book within you. Starting with your baseball dreams when you were younger thru the years with the Nationals. You can write on the struggles you have now. This could be a book of encouragement with a
    true perspective of your life experience.

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  4. It’s never too late to learn a new trade. It appears you have a creative mind, given your writing style. Try to leverage that in two very popular fields that use creativity: coding and design. For coding, codeacademy.com is a great place to start. For design, pick up a free copy of Paint.NET and start tinkering with image layers and modifying pictures. If you like either, follow what you’re good at. Meanwhile, keep writing – who knows, maybe you make a career of it. But if nothing else, good writing is useful in ANY career.

    You don’t have to use the degree you earned literally. You can use it to succeed in a different field – communications are important no matter what you do.

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  5. Tim, you have so much going for you in so many ways, it will come. You would make a strong coach, or broadcaster, with your personality. There are many reasons you were voted “Most Popular Harrisburg Senator” in 2012. Listen to Megan, your sister knows you well. You are multi-talented and your personality will get you places others will never see. You will always be my hero.

    I have always loved poetry and one of my old favorites is by Frank Stanton, called Keep A Goin’. You will like it. You had an amazing season in 2013; may 2014 be an even more successful year for you in whatever you do!

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  6. There is nothing more painful than getting the axe after 20 + years of marriage to baseball. I feel your pain Tim , only having played 3 years in the minors, but a near lifetime of dedication. Consider yourself lucky to have a degree. Many people get drafted after (3) years of college ball , having to go back and finish school. Its basically like 5-6 years of your life being sucked away then starting where you left off…The sickest part is I’d probably do it all over again.

    You seem like a bright guy and can certainly write well. People in the comment section seem to agree. Thank you for this post and people have it right – a book sharing your experience on the game of baseball and the baseball “life” for young players seems in order…

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  7. Sadly writing a book isn’t going to pay your bills. It’s got to be a tough transition that as a wife fear for my husband every year. Let us know if there is any networking or leads we can try and help you with. Networking is key. Call the fields you’ve played at, old coaches, teammates, email college professors to get your name out there that you’re looking for a job. I wish you the best. Don’t hesitate to reach out to us.
    The Rosenbaums

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  8. Tim, I had the opportunity to watch you play in College. I would strongly suggest that you look into the competitive world of sales. As a Sales Leader, I always like to hire ex-athletes as they have both the discipline and desire to succeed. I have had the opportunity to see many people, like you, go on and be very successful. As a dad of someone that has taken the exact same route as you, I can say the experience that you have gained playing minor league baseball is much more valuable than the experience you gain in your first job after college. You did not last 10 years in professional baseball by letting every 0-4 get you down. Don’t let a couple of months of rejection beat you.

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  9. I don’t know you, but a facebook friend posted this and I happened to click on it. I’m sure you’ve considered using your athletic background to pursue work as a personal trainer or something similar, but many people realize that those aren’t neccessarily careers with a good longevity. I work for a company called Onlife Health, a company that brings healthy living into employer workplaces. We’re always looking for people with your sort of background to serve as our “wellness coaches”, or people who work with individuals who need assistance and guidance on their path to healthy living. The great thing about Onlife is we’re a growing company that prides itself in promoting people from within, so your career options are unlimited. Our current head of Account Mangement is someone who started as a coach. I encourage you to google our company!

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      1. Sure! I My name is Melissa Dougherty. I’m not a wordpress user so I have no idea how to private message you, but if there is some way to do that I can definitely give you my contact information and tell you more about the company.

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      2. I created this account this morning specifically to write this post so I’m not really familiar with the ins and outs of the site myself… Do you have a facebook or a twitter account? I’m a lot more familiar with those platforms

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  10. Sales. Whether investment services or another trait along those lines. Seem to be friendly and good with words. Look into it. Very rewarding career that I have experience as a young guy myself.

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  11. I know what your going through. I dealt with the same thing. I played for Seattle for 5 years, and when I finally got out I struggled because I had the education but no experience…I went to college to become a cop, but after baseball I decided I would like to get into sales. I found a job, and took it just to gain some experience. 5 years later I am now in a career I really enjoy. I am a territory Manager selling sporting goods. I get to deal with coaches everyday so it keeps me in sports. Maybe think of that avenue. If you had any contracts with apparel, or hard goods, contact your rep and see if there is something there for you!- If you want more information you can find me on Linked in or Facebook. Good Luck!

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  12. You attack it just like you played the game. You practice and prepare and you study. Then you can be ready for that big at-bat like a job interview. You have to come through in the clutch and then keep honing your skills to stay above the average. It takes the same effort mentally and physically, just on a different field.

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  13. Tim, I just graduated with a degree in communication. trust me when I say this degree will get you somewhere. look into a certification like SEO (Search engine optimization) it’ll help you.

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  14. Tim,
    Always enjoyed watching you play, and loved that you always took the time to talk to fans. You might want to check with your local community college or your college’s placement offices. They can be helpful in your search. Utilize your alumni office as a resource as we’ll.

    Keep writing! You do write well, and as someone else said – good written skills are always useful.

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  15. While I didn’t last anywhere near 10 years in the minors, (2 and a year of indie ball) I know the feeling when baseball eventually kicks you out and you are left wondering what the hell you are going to do. I tried unsuccessfully to get jobs and eventually decided to go back and get my master’s degree. While going to school I was finally able to get a job working near full time, but there was a good amount of manual labor and it was a far fall from where I once was. *This required me putting quite a bit of pride on the shelf. Six months into my master’s program, I started interviewing for jobs/paid internships and found out that I had more offers from employers than I could handle. Baseball on my resume set me apart from everyone else. Because of all the teams I bounced around on, my unique life experiences, and all the host families I stayed with; my people skills were much better than the other people I was going up against. As a result, I got job offers from the top firms (over people with much higher GPAs). It was good to know that people did want me and that I could translate my competitive drive on the field to the class room/real world. I work for Deloitte now, and a close friend of mine, (7 yrs in the minors) who followed a similar path of going back to school and using the career services the university provides, just got hired by Goldman Sachs. There is a lot to look forward to, although it may not seem like it. My advice is to go back to school, take out student loans for a masters degree if you have to (just make sure its a worthwhile degree), and get after it. Good luck and let me know there is anything that I can do to help you or anyone reading this who is in the same position.

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    1. Thank you for taking time to read my blog and then taking more time to write your reply… Today has been an amazing day of a lot of people responding to my post and getting in touch with me to let me know that I’m not alone and there are a lot of options for me… Its been genuinely great. thanks again

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  16. Contact me and we can chat. I am a former MLBplayer and understand exactly where you are coming from.

    Contact me when you get an opportunity is email.

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  17. To alot of kids, baseball players are heroes. Take full advantage of that status and go back to school to get your education degree. You should be able to get it in just a few years since you already have a bachelors degree. Kids need good male role models today. I bet you would be an awesome teacher. You had a dream, chased it, learned how important it is to have folks to encourage you along the way and love you when you ‘woke up’ from that dream. That’s exactly what kids need. Someone who understands it all. I suggest you visit your closest school and get involved as a volunteer for a bit and see how it feels. Twenty-seven years as an elementary school secretary has taught me there is not a better job out there than one that impacts the life of a kid in a positive way. Plus – you could have alot of time off in the summer to, let’s see…..oh yeah – play baseball!🙂

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  18. Tim, loved covering you at a local tv station last summer in Sioux Falls. It was fun watching you blast home runs at a record pace! Don’t ever give up man, and if you are SF, I’d love to talk and do a story, perhaps!
    God Bless!

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  19. I feel exactly what your saying my friend. I went down a similar path but didn’t play as long as you in the minors. Fitness, lessions and staying in the sport will keep your bills paid. Also being a motivational speaker for companies an teams in and around your area will work. As soon as you start working in whatever company they will see your leadership and swagger. I’m in Dallas my man so if you need anything email me. Cedrob365@gmail.com

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  20. Tim , great article and well written. I have a son who has followed a similar path. He too has the same concerns. As I told him; the qualities and traits that have carried you this far in pursuing your dream will translate well to anything you choose to do. The strength of character that allows talent to play also allows you to forge a new career. Perseverance , work ethic, positive attitude, the ability to adapt and adjust to new situations will all serve you well in the future. You learned all of these thru your baseball career. While you chased the dream you gathered skills and strengths you aren’t aware of. One of my friends once described a similar time in his life as a million dollar experience you wouldn’t pay a dime for.

    Now the hardest part is deciding what your next career is. Try to find something you love doing. Go at it with the same dedication you showed in your first career. Remember most people change jobs/careers at least twice if not three times in their lives. I think Henry Ford said” consider everything you do up to 40 as an investment in yourself”. He turned out ok! So will you! Good luck

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  21. Tim,
    Ryan Mock here, whom you may rember (though, really, almost certainly do not, because, seriously, why would you?) as the radio guy in Hagerstown. I went through pretty much the same situation a couple years ago – there came a point when I realized the odds were too long, the lifestyle losing some shine – and I left the career I’d been planning since I was a kid. Those were not easy days, just after.

    But, it turns out, there was life after baseball – even with an outdated degree in Sports Media. I went back to school (I’m currently in law school), I’ve explored other interests. And I’ve realized that while I miss being around baseball, I can still enjoy the game. This just gives me an opportunity to enjoy some other aspect of my life as well.

    You’re a bright guy, with a very-cool bullet point on his resume, and I’m sure you’ll find your feet.

    Best of luck,
    Ryan

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  22. Entirely depends on the school. Would be totally happy to talk with you about the process, ups-and-downs, etc. Not sure this is the best forum. Shoot me a note at mockryan at gmail if you want.

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  23. Hearing stories from your pro career, it sounds like you were great with fans and the kids! My question is have you ever thought about working front office in baseball. As a former player myself, my career quickly ended with an injury. I found an internship for a baseball team and have never looked back. If you share passion for baseball, putting on events and making people happy, outside the lines could be a great fit!

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    1. Jesse, thanks for taking the time to read my blog and write out a response, I’ve definitely thought about the front office of a team. I’ve played on several teams where no one in their front office had ever played so they didn’t understand what the players themselves are looking for. There’s a disconnect there that makes for an unpleasant relationship between the office and the players. I would think it would be a great benefit to have a formal player in the front office… Thanks for your note!

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  24. Hey Tim,

    Nats fan and fellow jersey resident here! How about coaching? A guy with your experience and grit would be great addition to any team!

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  25. Tim, my family has had season tickets for 5 years with the Harrisburg Senators, so we were lucky enough to watch your career. In those 5 years I haven’t seen another player that had such a commanding authority at first base than you did. I surely haven’t seen anyone who played first as well defensively. Not to mention your ability to hit the long ball. We also followed your career with the Canaries last year. It is unfortunate that now a days to make it to the majors you have to be some phenomenal player that everybody starts watching in little league and counts down the days until you can get drafted. But I want to tell you is that you have some great talent and also you have something not all great athletes have……. A personality that the fans love!!!!! My 10 year old son’s highlight, that he still talks about, is when 3 seasons during one of the cold April night games he got the opportunity to go up and announce the batters for the inning. It was you, Adam Fox, and Chris Rahl. That was when the whole Pahooooota thing was getting started, and he belted out the loudest and longest Pahooooota that he could. Over the couple seasons that you were with the Senators he must have gotten at least a dozen or more of your autographs, heck at the end of the season 2 years ago we even got your locker name plate and he got you to sign that. Hopefully you remember that because you looked surprised when he asked you to sign it and you even asked if he went in a stole it off your locker… Well now that he is 10 I am letting him decorate his own room, and he wants a sports theme. Well he and I are building a locker, similar to those at the Senators, for his baseball gear and the one thing he wants on it is that autographed name plate of yours that we have sealed in Plexiglas….. So what I am trying to say is that you don’t need to be some major league player to have kids look up to you and respect you and have some kind of positive impact in their life. I would like to challenge you to see what it would take to be a high school teacher and be the baseball coach. With already having a college degree it shouldn’t take that many courses and with your experience playing pro-ball you should be able get the job. What better way to be able to use your life experience than to be able to teach and coach the young ball players who’s dreams are to make it to the big leagues and give them the training and skill sets that they need, but also the guidance to stay in school and get that college degree so they will have something to fall back on if they are not to be that 1% who make it. If this is what you end up doing, I think 15…..20 years down the road when that student/player that didn’t quite make it to the majors comes back to check out his old high school, stops in and thanks you for the advice of getting that college degree so he would have something to fall back on, that with your personality, that would make it all worth your while. Also I think with your skill at first base and hitting you could produce some 1% ers as well….. Either way, and no matter what you do decide to with your life, just know that you will always my family as big fans and if you ever visit Harrisburg you got someone to go fishing, hunting, skiing, or golfing with……..

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    1. This is a really nice note Marc and I’m so glad you took the time to write it. I absolutely remember your son and the nameplate off my locker, please tell him I said Hi and send me a picture of the room when he gets it all squared away. Thank you again for the sentiment, its so good to hear and I really appreciate it

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    2. Hi Tim,
      My name’s Richard and I know precisely where you are coming from. I agree without reservation that minor league baseball players are getting the short end of the stick BUT you were a consenting adult and went into sign that contract with your eyes wide open. I’m sure you’ve heard this argument many MANY times before. Its sad, no doubt, but true. NOBDY forced you to choose that career path and the rewards if you were fortunate enough to make it into the big leagues is HUGE. The comparison to being a treasure diver comes to mind. You choose that career path for basically the same reasons. If you “make it” you’re rich, but if you don’t, well you know. The other point to be made here is that you did get to live out your dream. Thats so commendable and its a lot more than most ever EVER get to do.

      So what now … well you’re in the big company. Your degree is absolutely useless. BUT, it was essentially useless when you received it. A college degree today is essentially what a high school diploma was worth 30 years ago. Unless you went on to get a graduate degree, you were going to start at the bottom anyhow. Which is where you and millions of other college graduates are today. It sucks but “whoa is me” and “ain’t it awful” isn’t gonna do you one bit of good. And you probably already know that.

      With your personality, SALES is where you should be. The money in sales “if you make it” is HUGE. Just stay away from ANY ADS IN THE NEWSPAPER. They are ALL BULL !!! I guarantee you that. You need to talk to people, find the ones that have scored big, and bang on those doors and sell your way into a job opportunity. Straight commission is the way to go. Salary means low opportunity ! I have been a “head hunter” for many years. If there’s one thing I know, its where the $$$ is. Give a look a timeshare sales. With a reputable company the money is awesome and the hours are great. You could also go back to school. A friend of mine became a nurse and he did it in less than two years of schooling. Nursing for men is in EXTREMELY high demand and he’s already making six figure income.

      Best wishes !!!

      Richard

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  26. Am I supposed to feel sorry for you? Or do you just want to appear sorry for yourself? That’s the attitude that will pick you up from the bootstraps and allow you to accomplish something in life bud. Stop feeling sorry for yourself and do something. It could be a whole heck of a lot worse.

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  27. If I recall, back in the day with the Harrisburg Senators, I told you that you could be a photographer. You took a great photo of the flooded Metro Bank Park, as you were in flight to Richmond to play the Squirrels? Maybe that could be a new career for you🙂 PAHUTA!

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  28. Hey Tim, looks like I’m a year late to this blog, but I recently heard you were a ball player and wanted to look you up. It was a lifetime ago, but we played travel soccer together on the Readington Eagles.

    Hope the job situation has worked out for you. If you’re ever in Manhattan and want to grab a beer and catch up (I still see a couple of those guys every once and awhile) let me know.

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